Sunday Worship, 10 am

Bible Study, 9 am

Contact Us

Phone: (909) 622-1144

Fax: (909) 622-5771

Email: fcc@fccpomona.org

1751 N. Park Ave
Pomona, CA 91768

Office Hours:
Monday: 9am – 1pm
Tuesday: 9am – 1pm
Wednesday: 9am – 12:30pm
Thursday: 9am – 1pm
Friday: 9am – 1pm

If you'd like to meet someone before you walk through that door the first time, just give us a call or send us an email.

We'll arrange for one or two of our members have coffee or something with you and give you a chance to get to know someone, so you won’t be by yourself for your first visit.

Links

Spirituality

Worship Audio: “Rest, Renewal, & Restoration”, 7/12/15

(To play, click on the far left of each long rectangle.)

 

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Introduction to Scripture Reading and Meditation:

 

Scripture Reading and Meditation

 

 

Story: “Renewed through Welcome”, Alicia Martin

 

Story: “Renewed through Mission”, Jim Ross

 

Story: “Renewed through Forgiveness”, Jessica Ellis

 

Story: “Renewed through Service”, Tom Reed

 

Story: “Renewed through Nature”, Keith Fisher

 

 

Lent 2015: Blooming in the Desert

 

 

 

Ash Wednesday: Feb. 18, 6 pm

Dinner will begin at 6 pm. Worship begins approximately at 6:40.  Worship is a time of contemplation through a variety of both hands-on experiences and quiet reflection. Throughout the sanctuary there will be prayer practices designed to engage people of different ages. The main portion of the service is self-directed as worshipers choose their way to pray. We sing together and receive the imposition of ashes to mark the beginning of our Lenten season, a time we focus a bit more intentionally on growing up in Christ.

 

Lectio Divina: Sunday Mornings in Lent, 9 am

Join Pastor Julie Roberts-Fronk in the practice of praying scripture, sometimes called “lectio divnia”. Beginning at 9 am in the Small Dining Room, we will learn and experience ways of praying scripture using the scripture to be used in worship that Sunday. This is a way to prepare yourself to experience God in worship more fully. It is also a way to help prepare our community as some of us will inhabit the space of sanctuary differently after having prayed the scripture together.

We will begin at 9:00 am, so please arrive a few minutes before. The experience is meant to help us rest in the Spirit, mostly quietly. The session ends no later than 9:25.

 

Contemplative Practices Class: Monday Evenings, 7:30 pm, Feb 23. – April 6

Werner Tillinger, our Ministerial Intern, is leading another series on contemplative practices. Each session will focus on a particular practice so participants may deeply experience one practice at a time. This series is designed to give the participant both a range of experience as well as time to be engaged deeply by each experience.

The class begins at 7:30 pm and will meet in the Conference Room. Enter the Office entrance. The length of each class is designed last 60 minutes.

 

 

On Being Celebratory Christans by Ginger Eckeard

Ginger Eckeard, one of our Elders, encouraged us with this words on Dec. 28 the fourth day of Christmas.

I was going to talk to you about the cost of raising a baby today, especially one who is like, a big leader in the Christian Church. But then I thought, to take another path. A clearer choice.

Three days ago Christians celebrated the birth of a baby boy child around the world. It is a profound celebration for believers, it is highly expensive for those who celebrate by shopping. For over 5 weeks, actually since Thanksgiving, we have been inundated with reports about the crowds, the bargains, the amount of money spent. Even the fight over a $4.00 Barbie Doll in the Los Angeles Area that resulted in an arrest was particularly bizarre.

In a huge heartfelt way, now the burden of the cost of Christmas falls not on the shoppers, but on the celebratory Christians. With the birth of Jesus, we have a task, we have a mission from God. Not to be the best shopper, but to be the best giver. We are called to share the news of the baby Jesus, and what that means to each one of us and to the world. We are called to be stewards of the Church in what we have and who we are. We are called to give, so that the message can be heard far and wide. We are called to help others, include others, love others. This is the ministryadvent wreath we gladly accept.

Dec. 25 Christmas: New Beginnings by Melissa Fain

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John 1:1 CEB
In the beginning was the Word
and the Word was with God
and the Word was God.

Everything on Earth has a beginning, and the beginning never looks like the journey. Beginnings are new and innocent. Beginnings are fragile. While something established might be difficult to break, something new needs to be loved and cared for. It cannot exist on its own. It needs more attention than that which is already established. If the new idea person or group gets the tender loving care it needs, it could deeply impact us in the future. Nothing is possible without a solid start with help from others.
Today appreciate the fragility of the Christmas moment. This was the beginning of the greatest story ever. Jesus came as a displaced baby, born in a stable. Looking at the moment, I’m sure no one would predict the impact this beginning would have on the future.

God of new beginnings,
In this moment of newness, help me find the care that new life needs to grow up strong. Amen

Dec. 24 Jesus: A Precious Baby by Kimberly Russell

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“Sometimes we must yield control to others and accept our vulnerability so we can be healed.”
Kathy Magliato, Healing Hearts: A Memoir of a Female Heart Surgeon

I stand by a crib in the ICU, watching a tiny baby sleep. This baby has never been home, never known life outside of a hospital. Born premature, she needed time to develop and gain strength. When it was time be discharged, she didn’t go home, she was transferred to another hospital. This baby girl, only a few weeks old, has a diagnosis of leukemia.
We often recall Jesus as a Savior, a miracle worker or a parable teller but Jesus started off just like each one of us. Jesus was an infant. He was born in a strange place and depended on others to care for him. It is in that state of vulnerability that we connect with the Messiah. Jesus experienced leaving the protective warmth of Mary’s womb and a medical procedure of circumcision, a rite in his culture. From birth, dangers surrounded him that he could not face alone, and Jesus placed inherent trust in those that care for him to be the stronghold where he was vulnerable.

Creator God,
Thank you for reminding me we all experience vulnerable moments. Be a strength in my time of weakness and guide me to the people willing to be a stronghold for me in times of vulnerability.
Amen